Saturday, February 13, 2016

Henry Kissinger’s War Crimes Are Central to the Divide Between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders

I continue to illuminate the truth about Henry Kissinger because the fact that Hillary Clinton would choose for one moment to boast of her connection with Kissinger rather than attempt to hide it is in itself hugely illuminating and profoundly disturbing as to her credentials and perspectives and patterns related to foreign policy. As more and more of us spread the word and become informed of critical issues such as this, the clearer it will be that it isn't just the Republican candidates who pose a serious threat to all through their hawkish belief systems and policies. It is also this Democratic candidate. Thank you for doing your part, whatever that may be, in being beckons of light and strong voices for truth in midst of the immersion of propaganda, which is the norm in American culture. Another world is possible. Peace ~ Molly

Hillary Clinton smiles as Henry Kissinger presents her with a Distinguished Leadership Award from the Atlantic Council in Washington in May 2013.

Excerpts from this article in The Intercept by Dan Froomkin

The sparring during Thursday’s Democratic presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders over whether Henry Kissinger is an elder statesman or a pariah has laid bare a major foreign policy divide within the Democratic Party.
Clinton and Sanders stand on opposite sides of that divide. One represents the hawkish Washington foreign policy establishment, which reveres and in some cases actually works for Kissinger. The other represents the marginalized non-interventionists, who can’t possibly forgive someone with the blood of millions of brown people on his hands.
Kissinger is an amazing and appropriate lens through which to see what’s at stake in the choice between Clinton and Sanders. But that only works, of course, if you understand who Kissinger is — which surely many of today’s voters don’t.
The sparring during Thursday’s Democratic presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders over whether Henry Kissinger is an elder statesman or a pariah has laid bare a major foreign policy divide within the Democratic Party.
Clinton and Sanders stand on opposite sides of that divide. One represents the hawkish Washington foreign policy establishment, which reveres and in some cases actually works for Kissinger. The other represents the marginalized non-interventionists, who can’t possibly forgive someone with the blood of millions of brown people on his hands.
Kissinger is an amazing and appropriate lens through which to see what’s at stake in the choice between Clinton and Sanders. But that only works, of course, if you understand who Kissinger is — which surely many of today’s voters don’t...
Please go here for the full article: https://theintercept.com/2016/02/12/henry-kissingers-war-crimes-are-central-to-the-divide-between-hillary-clinton-and-bernie-sanders/
And now, some background about Kissinger.
Greg Grandin, a history professor at New York University, just published a timely book called Kissinger’s Shadow: The Long Reach of America’s Most Controversial Statesman. In an article in The Nation last week, “Henry Kissinger, Hillary Clinton’s Tutor in War and Peace,” he offered this pithy summary:
Let’s consider some of Kissinger’s achievements during his tenure as Richard Nixon’s top foreign policy–maker. He (1) prolonged the Vietnam War for five pointless years; (2) illegally bombed Cambodia and Laos; (3) goaded Nixon to wiretap staffers and journalists; (4) bore responsibility for three genocides in Cambodia, East Timor, and Bangladesh; (5) urged Nixon to go after Daniel Ellsberg for having released the Pentagon Papers, which set off a chain of events that brought down the Nixon White House; (6) pumped up Pakistan’s ISI, and encouraged it to use political Islam to destabilize Afghanistan; (7) began the U.S.’s arms-for-petrodollars dependency with Saudi Arabia and pre-revolutionary Iran; (8) accelerated needless civil wars in southern Africa that, in the name of supporting white supremacy, left millions dead; (9) supported coups and death squads throughout Latin America; and (10) ingratiated himself with the first-generation neocons, such as Dick Cheney and Paul Wolfowitz, who would take American militarism to its next calamitous level. Read all about it inKissinger’s Shadow!
A full tally hasn’t been done, but a back-of-the-envelope count would attribute 3, maybe 4 million deaths to Kissinger’s actions, but that number probably undercounts his victims in southern Africa. Pull but one string from the current tangle of today’s multiple foreign policy crises, and odds are it will lead back to something Kissinger did between 1968 and 1977. Over-reliance on Saudi oil? That’s Kissinger. Blowback from the instrumental use of radical Islam to destabilize Soviet allies? Again, Kissinger. An unstable arms race in the Middle East? Check, Kissinger. Sunni-Shia rivalry? Yup, Kissinger. The impasse in Israel-Palestine? Kissinger. Radicalization of Iran?  “An act of folly” was how veteran diplomat George Ball described Kissinger’s relationship to the Shah. Militarization of the Persian Gulf?  Kissinger, Kissinger, Kissinger.
The late essayist Christopher Hitchins examined Kissinger’s war crimes in his 2001 book, The Trial of Henry Kissinger. He listed the key elements of his case:
1. The deliberate mass killing of civilian populations in Indochina.
2. Deliberate collusion in mass murder, and later in assassination, in Bangladesh.
3. The personal suborning and planning of murder, of a senior constitutional officer in a democratic nation — Chile — with which the United States was not at war.
4. Personal involvement in a plan to murder the head of state in the democratic nation of Cyprus.
5. The incitement and enabling of genocide in East Timor
6. Personal involvement in a plan to kidnap and murder a journalist living in Washington, D.C.
.............
A few weeks ago, I talked to Chas Freeman, the former diplomat I once called a “one-man destroyer of groupthink,” whose non-interventionism and even-handed approach to the Middle East was so un-Kissingeresque that his surprising appointment to President Obama’s National Intelligence Council in 2009 lasted all of a few days.
He marveled at the lack of any “honest brokers” in the D.C. foreign policy establishment. “We have a foreign policy elite in this country that’s off its meds, basically,” he said.
“There’s no debate because everybody’s interventionist, everybody’s militaristic.” They all are pretty much in the thrall of neoconservatism, he said. You can see them “speckled all over the Republican side” and “also in the Clinton group.”
Henry Kissinger is thus a litmus test for foreign policy. But don’t count on the mainstream media to help you understand that.
Imagine two types of people: those who would schmooze with Kissinger at a cocktail party, and those who would spit in his eye. The elite Washington media is almost without exception in that first category. In fact, they’d probably have anyone who spit in Kissinger’s eye arrested.
Since they only see one side, they don’t want to get into it. And there was a little indicator at Thursday night’s debate, hosted by PBS, of just how eagerly the elite political media welcomes an honest exploration of the subject.
Just as Sanders raised the issue of Kissinger’s legacy in Vietnam, either Gwen Ifill or Judy Woodruff — both of whom are very conventional, establishment, Washington cocktail-party celebrities — was caught audibly muttering, “Oh, God.”

Friday, February 12, 2016

Tara Brach: A Sacred Refuge


Most of us need to be reminded that we are good, that we are lovable, that we belong. If we knew just how powerfully our thoughts, words, and actions affected the hearts of those around us, we'd reach out and join hands again and again. Our relationships have the potential to be a sacred refuge, a place of healing and awakening. With each person we meet, we can learn to look behind the mask and see the one who longs to love and be loved.
 
- Tara Brach
 

Robert Thurman: Imagine a Culture


Imagine a culture in which everything is geared toward helping 
all individuals become the best human beings they can be; 
in which individuals are driven to devoting their lives to becoming 
enlightened by the natural flood of compassion for 
others that arises from their wisdom.
 
- Robert Thurman
 

Why Our Government Isn't Listening: How Greed Is at the Root of US Suffering

By Eliza A. Webb, Truthout | News Analysis

(Photo: US Currency via Shutterstock; Edited: LW / TO)
In the United States, children go hungry.

Human beings endure poverty so deep "many people don't believe [it] exists here." US residents pay far more for health care than the people of any other wealthy country, yet their bodies are sicker and more broken. The public school system is unfairly funded and racist. Workers go abused and underpaid. The government throws more people behind bars than any other nation in the world. More than one in four Black and Brown Americans are living in poverty, further undermined by institutional racism and murderous police forces. Hispanic and Latina women are making 54 cents on the dollar compared to white men. More people are buried here because of gun violence than in any other industrialized country.
The American people are suffering.
Yet this is not a poor country. While kids' stomachs rumble and Native families struggle to survive, the top 0.1 percent of Americans are sitting on as much wealth as the bottom 90 percent combined.
The workers of this country see scraps from the tables they set and serve.

Oppression is a highly profitable business.

So why is it that the government of such a fabulously wealthy country does not provide for its people, in fairness or equality? Why are the individuals who make the laws and rule the land allowing this oppression and abuse to persist? Why do they not voice the needs of the people, as is their sole responsibility?   
Follow. The. Money.
How the United States Could Be
Taken altogether, these billions of dollars, lost on tax breaks and subsidies for wealthy corporations, could be used to fund the impoverished schools serving the United States' impoverished children, job programs to employ the jobless youth, universal health care for the country's sick and dying people, reformation of a racistcriminal legal system, higher education for broke young people, nutrition programs for hungry children - the possibilities of using these resources to create a thriving, blooming society and nation are limitless.
Only a corrupt Congress and the lucrative, symbiotic relationship between Democrats, Republicans and rich, corporate individuals stand in the way.
So the next time you hear a politician say change is too hard, or that the real world doesn't include transforming this oligarchy into a democracy, take a closer look at who is padding his or her pockets. If the person benefiting from the status quo is trying to convince you it should stay the same, doubt to high heaven and beyond what he or she is telling you.
After all, a shark won't smile and shake your hand before biting you in the back.
But a politician will.
-----------
Eliza A. Webb is a published writer on politics in The Hill, Salon and The Michigan Journal of International Affairs.

Reflections on the Value of Sharing Our Stories


 Breaking the Silence

We often grow up in families who adhere - to one degree or another - to the shame-based rules of don't talk, don't trust, don't feel. I also refer to this as shut up, shut down, shut out. Many of us also learn these rules in our culture. Which results in closing off big parts of ourselves to others. And also to often being strangers to our own depths, to our own hearts and genuine needs and authenticity. This is the fertile ground from which shame and addictions, anger and fear, untouched grief and unrecognized projections, and all the many faces of violence - subtle and overt - toward ourselves and others grow. 

And this is what I have been working to recognize and understand about myself and embrace and heal and transform for many years now. 

Speaking and sharing our stories breaks through the silence and the shame and the sense of separateness. And we come to grow, instead, in self-compassion, understanding, trust, acceptance, connection, courage, and love. And the protective walls we have built around our capacity for vulnerability, wholeness, tenderness, empathy, and the sweetness and beauty of our true nature gradually fall away. This is the journey of the blossoming of our hearts. 

May we each be increasingly mindful of our choices related to vulnerabilty. May we choose to share more of our deeper selves with wider circles of those who are also bravely intent on walking a path of lovingkindness and awakening heart. Our world inside and out will change and shift and deepen and evolve as we do. Bless us all. Life is often hard. And rich and beautiful. We need each other. We are truly all in this together.

Namaste ~ Molly

~♥~

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Sharon Salzberg: Going Deeper Into Our Own Hearts


If you go deeper and deeper into your own heart, 
you'll be living in a world with less fear, isolation and loneliness.
 
- Sharon Salzberg

Bernie Sanders: We Will All Come Together


What began last week in Iowa, what voters here in New Hampshire confirmed tonight, is nothing short of the beginning of a political revolution. It is—it is a political revolution that will bring tens of millions of our people together. It will bring together working people who have given up on the political process. It will bring together young people who have never participated in the political process. It will bring together blacks and whites, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, straight and gay, male and female, people who were born in America and people who immigrated here. We will all come together to say loudly and clearly that the government of our great nation belongs to all of us, not just a few wealthy campaign contributors. That is what this campaign is about. That is what the political revolution is about. So, New Hampshire, thank you again. And now it’s on—thank you, New Hampshire. And now it’s on to Nevada, South Carolina and beyond.

- Bernie Sanders

Pema Chödrön: Our True Nature


Our true nature is like a precious jewel: although it 
may be temporarily buried in mud, it remains 
completely brilliant and unaffected. 
We simply have to uncover it.
 
 - Pema Chödrön
 
 

Monday, February 8, 2016

Rachel Naomi Remen: A Seed Of Greater Wholeness


Wisdom comes most easily to those who have the courage to 
embrace life without judgment and are willing to not know, sometimes 
for a long time. It requires us to be more fully and simply alive than 
we have been taught to be. It may require us to suffer. 
But ultimately we will be more than we were when we began. 
There is the seed of a greater wholeness in everyone.
 
-  Rachel Naomi Remen
 

Sunday, February 7, 2016

Jayne Relaford Brown: Finding Her Here


I am becoming the woman I've wanted,
grey at the temples,
soft body, delighted,
cracked up by life
with a laugh that's known bitter
but, past it, got better,
knows she's a survivor-
that whatever comes,
she can outlast it.
I am becoming a deep
weathered basket.

I am becoming the woman I've longed for,
the motherly lover
with arms strong and tender,
the growing daughter
who blushes surprises.
I am becoming full moons
and sunrises.

I find her becoming,
this woman I've wanted,
who knows she'll encompass,
who knows she's sufficient,
knows where she's going
and travels with passion.
Who remembers she's precious,
but knows she's not scarce-
who knows she is plenty,
plenty to share.

- Jayne Relaford Brown 

Photo by Laerke Posselt: Gun-Britt Zeller 

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